Market analysis online dating

Tinder, America’s fast-growing online-dating juggernaut, last week unveiled its first big branding partnership aimed at its core audience of millennial fling-seekers: a neon-drenched video-ad campaign hyping Bud Light’s mega-keg party, “Whatever, USA.” Meanwhile, over at Tinder’s less-youthful rival e Harmony, a recent ad saw its 80-year-old founder counseling a single woman besieged by bridesmaid’s invitations to take some time (and, of course, the site’s 200-question compatibility quiz) to find that special someone: “Beth, do you want fast or forever?

” Both companies are dominant forces in America’s .2 billion online-dating industry, which in the last few years has quickly become a bedrock of the American love life.

In the UK, it is worth £300m a year and, according to the UK’s Online Dating Association (ODA), ‘’. These sites differ in terms of their number of users, their user characteristics, geographic coverage, and in their business models.

And the offer is widening: matchmaking, niche dating, social dating, dating apps, and online personals, are all examples of new products that have been launched in recent years. The subscription-based model is the preferred business model of some of the largest sites.

Having constant access to a pool of potential matches at their fingertips is making people more impatient, causing unrealistic expectations for first dates and a general decline in effort.

Daters are "more quick to judge because they know that if you're not spectacular, they can go back to their inbox, and just swipe right again tomorrow," Jacoby says.

It has become increasingly common for individuals to find their partners online, a trend which started around 1997.

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